Update on DJIA: Mar 18, 2020

In our last dedicated update on the Dow [see: July 2019 Update], we noted the intersection of a number of overhead resistance features in its chart and offered some thoughts on its downside potential if it managed to reverse. Note that our 18974 target represents a backtest of the red channel from which DJIA broke … continue reading →

What’s Next?

The futures are lock limit down again this morning, with ETFs trading in the after-hours indicating losses on the (eventual) open of up to 10%. This is probably not what the Fed had in mind when they unleashed the massive, emergency rate cut and $700 billion in new QE an hour before the futures opened … continue reading →

COVID-19: What to Expect

This article was originally posted March 13 and will be updated on a regular basis.  Updates are in reverse order, meaning the latest update is just below. UPDATE:  April 3, 2020 Out of curiosity, I took a look at mortality rate trends in a few other countries. While some are clearly better than others, every … continue reading →

Update on VIX: Mar 10, 2020

It’s been a while since we took a big picture look at VIX. Since it reached levels not seen since the GFC yesterday, this seemed like as good a time as any. VIX is an interesting instrument. Once a reliable measure of volatility in the market, it was used by many to hedge risk.  As … continue reading →

When Will News Begin to Matter Again?

Apparently AAPL slashing guidance is inconsequential and Bill Gates, who is predicting 10 million deaths, is some sort of conspiracy theorist – because the market continues to ignore the coronavirus story. Perhaps somewhere down the line the investing world will come to realize what we’ve known for years: stocks have become increasingly easy to manipulate. … continue reading →

The Snoozefest Continues

All the bullish factors which have kept stocks aloft the past two sessions are still going at it.  Hence, the futures’ snoozefest even as Trump is about to be impeached.The only potential fly in the ointment remains oil and gas, which have reached an important decision point. continued for members… … continue reading →

Inflation Games

Inflation drives interest rates. Though the Fed probably wishes it didn’t, it’s an inconvenient truth.  There are much tighter correlations, but consider the strong positive correlation between CPI and 10Y notes. This matters, of course, because with $22 trillion in debt, the US faces the same problem as the ECB and Japan: High interest rates … continue reading →

Test Passed, So Far…

ES spent 6 1/2 hours yesterday anguishing over the trend line/neckline we discussed.  When the Fed minutes came out, it even broke down a bit from the rising channel it had constructed overnight.  The breakdown seemed like it was sticking.  But, just after the close, WTI spiked and VIX dumped. That’s all it took to … continue reading →